Bunny Haven Rabbitry
14450 I.H. 35 South Von Ormy, TX 78073 US
Phone: 210-274-3217 Website: http://www.sanantoniobunnyhaven.com

Peacocks, Peafowls and peachicks

Red Golden Pheasant chicks

Rabbits and chickens for sale in San Antonio area.  Bexar Country

peacocks, peacock, peachicks, peachick, peahens, peahen, pheasant, pheasants

Peacocks, Peafowls and peachicks
Red Golden Pheasant chicks
Rabbits and chickens for sale in San Antonio area.  Bexar Country
peacocks, peacock, peachicks, peachick, peahens, peahen, pheasant, pheasants


Peacocks, Peafowls and peachicks
Red Golden Pheasant chicks
Rabbits and chickens for sale in San Antonio area.  Bexar Country
peacocks, peacock, peachicks, peachick, peahens, peahen, pheasant, pheasants


Peacocks, Peafowls and peachicks
Red Golden Pheasant chicks
Rabbits and chickens for sale in San Antonio area.  Bexar Country
peacocks, peacock, peachicks, peachick, peahens, peahen, pheasant,
pheasants

How to care for Adolescents

Peas which are old enough that they do not need the heat lamp can be moved to a larger space. They will need a pen that is made from strong fence material with a closed in top to keep them safe from predators. Peafowl will like being able to see more of their surroundings and get used to where home is supposed to be- this won't stop 100% of them from leaving if you decide to let yours free range but it may help. Also at this time you should treat them with a good wormer.

What to feed Chicks
Peachicks should be fed medicated game starter or medicated chick starter mixed with game-bird starter. Make sure to get the starter with amprolium for the prevention of Coccidiosis. Starter should have 20-24% protein, which is higher than chickens (For example, my chick starter has 18% protein, my game bird starter has 24%... When you mix the two it should land somewhere in the middle).

Bunny Haven Rabbitry and Poultry Farm

Bunny Haven Rabbitry and Poultry Farm
14450 I.H. 35 South Von Ormy, TX 78073 US
Phone: 210-274-3217 Website: http://www.sanantoniobunnyhaven.com
Check out our                      page for what's available

Please call to ensure that I am available at the time you wish to visit.


* We raise and sell Chickens, Peafowls and Rabbits.*
Lops, Dwarfs and Lionheads rabbits, with many bunnies to choose from call and come by to

find your pet rabbit or poultry.

Located on the Southwest side

of San Antonio Inside Loop 1604

Helpful Facts for Raising Peafowls

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How to care for peachicks
Chicks should be housed in a brooder, some people use wire-bottom to prevent diseases that is found in the soil. I kept my own in a clean, new brooder with sand and have not had a problem. You will need to keep them off natural ground and DO NOT use anything slippery for bedding- newspaper, bare plastic or metal. Improper footing can lead to straddle-leg. The brooder should be free of drafts and kept clean. Chicks can be moved to normal pens around 3 months of age. By this time they will have full feathers and be better able to cope with any medical problems that may arrive.


Adults
Peafowl are omnivorous, which means they will eat any plant matter as well as bugs, amphibians, and anything else alive that they can fit into their beaks. Penned adult birds can be fed game-bird maintenance crumbles/pellets. You can feed them normal chicken food but it will not have sufficient protein. You can make this up by feeding them kitten hard food as a supplement/treat. If they are penned without access to dirt or pebbles, they may need supplemental grit. Adults can be given treats like hard-boiled eggs, melons (watermelon, cantaloupe, etc.), squashes, tomatoes, greens (spinach, lettuce, etc.), beans, crickets, wet cat food, pasta, rice, raspberries, strawberries, blueberries (etc.), peas, cucumbers, bread (may want to moisten), peanuts, raisins, cooked meats (never raw or partially raw),  grapes, corn.

How to care for Adult Peafowl

Adults can either be kept in pens which keep them safe or be allowed to free range. Whether or not they free range, they should have access to an indoor area where heat can be provided (especially in winter). They can have free access to ground by now. Chicken wire and wooden enclosures seems fairly typical for them. Enclosures should not be smaller than 10x20x6ft high, and it should definitely have a top. Roosts/perches should be provided and it is best for these to have flat surfaces. In the winter, a round roost will leave their toes exposed overnight and can lead to frostbite. If you are allowing a male to free range, it is a good idea to keep a female penned to increase the chance that he will return.