Bunny Haven Rabbitry and Poultry Farm
14450 I.H. 35 South Von Ormy, TX 78073 US
Phone: 210-274-3217 Website: http://www.sanantoniobunnyhaven.com
Bunny Haven Rabbitry
14450 I.H. 35 South Von Ormy, TX 78073 US
Phone: 210-622-9389 Website: http://www.sanantoniobunnyhaven.com
Check out our                         page for what's available

Please call to ensure that I am available at the time you wish to visit.



*We raise and sell Lops, Dwarfs and Lionheads rabbits,*
with many bunnies to choose
from call and come by to
find your pet rabbit

Located on the Southwest side of San Antonio
Inside Loop 1604



Bunny Guide How to care for your rabbit

rabbits and chickens for sale in San Antonio area.  Bexar Country

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Bunny Guide Rabbits for sale San Antonio area. Bexar Country rabbit, bunny, bunnies Holland Lops, lionheads, Dwarfs.

Chickens chicks ducks peacocks
Bunny Guide How to care for your rabbit
rabbits and chickens for sale in San Antonio area.  Bexar Country
chicken, chicks, roosters, hens, rabbit, bunny, bunnies peachicks peacocks peafowl ducks duck duckling
Bunny Guide Rabbits for sale San Antonio area. Bexar Country rabbit, bunny, bunnies Holland Lops, lionheads, Dwarfs.
Chickens chicks ducks peacocksBunny Guide How to care for your rabbit
rabbits and chickens for sale in San Antonio area.  Bexar Country
chicken, chicks, roosters, hens, rabbit, bunny, bunnies peachicks peacocks peafowl ducks duck duckling
Bunny Guide Rabbits for sale San Antonio area. Bexar Country rabbit, bunny, bunnies Holland Lops, lionheads, Dwarfs.
Chickens chicks ducks peacocks
Bunny Guide How to care for your rabbit
rabbits and chickens for sale in San Antonio area.  Bexar Country
chicken, chicks, roosters, hens, rabbit, bunny, bunnies peachicks peacocks peafowl ducks duck duckling
Bunny Guide Rabbits for sale San Antonio area. Bexar Country rabbit, bunny, bunnies Holland Lops, lionheads, Dwarfs.
Chickens chicks ducks peacocks




Litter Box Training

Bunny Guide

 Teaching your rabbit to use a litter box is not as difficult as you may think. Because rabbits are naturally tidy, they make great candidates for litter box training. It is natural for a rabbit to choose one spot, usually corners, to urinate and leave their droppings. Keep in mind that persistence and patience is for success. Mature rabbits will learn faster than younger rabbits, as a rule. It's best to start litter training your rabbit when she is at least three months old. 
Litter box training works best if you have a play space set up for your rabbit along with her cage. It is recommended that you use an exercise pen, between 18 and 30 inches high, to create a play space around the cage. Attach the exercise pen to the cage, or place the exercise pen around the cage, allowing your rabbit to enter and exit the cage on her own. Using an exercise pen with the cage, keeps your rabbit in a safe and confined area. Always keep in mind that "if a rabbit can reach it, a rabbit will chew it." Take special care to make your rabbit's play space safe and free of items such as electrical cords, telephone cords, and house plants. The exercise pen can also be used to block a doorway, or secure your rabbit in a bathroom, kitchen, or other safe area. Choose a litter box that will fit inside your rabbit's cage. The litter box should not take up more than one third of the cage space. You will need one or two additional litter boxes in the future when you begin training your rabbit in a larger area. Simple, inexpensive boxes will work just fine for this. Choose your rabbit litter carefully as rabbits will nibble on some of the litter it needs to be safe and non-toxic. The House Rabbit Society recommends organic litters, made from plants, citrus or paper. (Some brands to look for: Care Fresh, Citra Fresh, Cat Country, Critter Country, Crown Animal Bedding, and Yesterday’s News). To get started, place a litter box in your rabbit's cage in the corner that she most frequently uses as her bathroom, and confine her to her cage. You may try putting a few of her dropping in the litter box as a hint. If she urinates in a corner of the cage not containing the box, move the box to that corner. You may have to move it a few times before she gets the idea. Be patient. Once she first uses the box, praise her and give her a special treat. Soon your rabbit will begin using the litter box regularly. Once your rabbit is using the litter box in her cage regularly, you can open her door and allow her to roam around in her play space. The Ultimate Goal is to have your rabbit return to her cage when she needs to go. In the beginning place one or two more litter boxes in your rabbit's play space. Eventually, the extra litter boxes can be removed from the play space. When you allow your rabbit to go in and out of her cage and into the play space on her own, keep an eye on her. If you see her backing up, pushing her back end against a wall, or raising her tail, your rabbit may be getting ready to urinate. Guide her back into her cage or litter box as soon as you notice this behavior. This will help your rabbit realize that she should urinate in the cage or litter box. You don’t want to make this seem like punishment, so be gentle and kind. As your rabbit gets better trained in her play space, you can increase her play area if you choose. Don't rush this process. If you increase the size of her play space too quickly, your rabbit may forget her way back to the cage or litter box. If your rabbit continually urinates in a spot where there is no litter box, put her litter box where she will use it even if it means rearranging her cage or moving some items in her play space. It is much easier to make her happy than to try to work against a determined rabbit. Some rabbits, especially males, might mark their territory with urine or droppings. There really isn't much you can do about this. Spaying or neutering will curb this behavior if it's done at an early age. Most male rabbits can be neutered at the age of 10-14 weeks old. Females can be spayed at 6 months old. See your veterinarian for more information.

 Below is a brief description of what you will need to care for your rabbit. Your rabbit will need a cage made of wire, with a water bottle and food dish or bin. Water bottles need to be refilled to insure your rabbit won’t run out of water on a hot day. Rabbits chew on wood, so your cage should not be made of wood, although you can rest the wire sections on a wooden frame and include replaceable wood pieces to rest on or nest in. Expect chewing damage on any wood the rabbit can get access to. The cage should be at least 24x24x18 high.   This is for a single rabbits, and can always be larger.  If your rabbits share a cage, add 50% or more to the size.

 Rabbits are social. A single bunny needs a friend. If you have only one rabbit and do not spend much time with it, consider getting a companion bunny, as rabbits are very social creatures and will get lonely and bored. In general, rabbits, especially same-sex litter-mates, can usually share a cage if you start when they are young. If you have a buck and a doe, or have older rabbits that have not been raised together, they will need separate cages. House your bunny buddies close together so they can communicate easily. A well socialized bunny makes a great companion for humans and will enjoy interaction with you. Hold your bunny every day and you will be rewarded with a friend that comes to greet you.
  Rabbits need plenty of water.  Always keep fresh water available.  You may use a bottle, dish, or watering system.  If you have a watering system or bottles with nozzles, leave a dish of water available until you are sure your new rabbit understands the new water source. Rabbits need to stay cool. If the cage will be outside, keep it in the shade in a protected area from strong weather and predators. In weather over 85 degrees, give your rabbit a frozen water bottle, preferable a square one, such as a 2 liter juice bottle. Square bottles won’t roll around and hurt the rabbit. A hot rabbit will lie next to or on top of the frozen bottle. Don’t use Blue Ice or other coolants, as the rabbit may chew and ingest the fluid.
Feed your rabbits at the same time every day (later afternoon or early evening is best as they are nocturnal), using the same brand of quality rabbit food. Give your rabbit about 1 ounce of food per pound of bunny. A 4 lb. bunny should receive ½ cup of feed per day, and Timothy Hay, Orchard Grass or greens (not lettuce). It’s OK to give your rabbit treats in moderation, small pieces of carrot, a slice of apple, etc. You don’t need to purchase expensive pet store rabbit treats; fresh fruits and vegetables will suit your bunny just fine. Beware that some foods have natural colors that stain the urine of rabbits, especially when too much is eaten. Red urine (not uncommon) usually comes from something the rabbit ate, and typically is not blood. *DO NOT FEED (your rabbit) iceberg lettuce, onion family, cabbage family(broccoli, Brussels-sprouts, etc.) and never Avocado*

Rabbits are nocturnal. Your bunny will eat and play mostly at night, and nap during the day. During the night, your Rabbit may rock out, keeping you awake if the cage is in your bedroom. Bunnies like to play. Rabbits enjoy toys, especially young rabbits. Vary the toys, as bunnies get bored, just like kids. You can use walnuts, a ring of measuring spoons, empty toilet paper rolls, empty paper towel rolls, knots of rope with wooden beads, and brown paper lunch sacks (opened up for them to hide in). Just make sure any toys are safe to chew. Rabbits also enjoy a romp around the yard. You can create a safe, mobile playpen in minutes by making a large circle out of a few yards of rabbit fencing available from Lowe’s, and hooking the ends together. Place the playpen in a shady spot that is safe from predators, neighbor dogs, etc.  Rabbits like to chew. Give your rabbit a piece of wood in the cage that is large enough to lie down on, and that can be chewed on safely and replaced easily. Rabbits’ teeth continue to grow, so they need to chew. Make sure you buy untreated wood. (no arsenic).
 Rabbits make good house pets. You can housetrain your bunny to use a litter box. Make sure your house is bunny-proofed, so no electric wires can be chewed. Bunnies will chew on anything with this in mind most people keep them in their cage during the day and let them out to socialize when they get home from work or school.  Bunny nails will need to be trimmed occasionally. Use a cat nail trimmer and hold the nail up to the light to ensure you avoid the blood vessel. Have some cornstarch on hand to stop any accidental bleeding. Very long nails can become dangerous to the rabbit and can be caught and pulled out if they are too long.  Bunnies make baby bunnies – very easily! Unless you plan to breed, do not put a buck (male) and doe (female) together, no matter how short of a period of time. You would be surprised at how fast they can do what bunnies do best. If you want to breed, get information from your breeder, internet, and rabbit books.